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The text in quotes and bold is the text with the note attached to it. “: Later motor cars, with more powerful engines, were sturdier and able to accommodate heavier carriage body-work. A railroad train, with its engineer, brakeman and conductor and fixed places of stoppage, is a creature of strict rules, and those who travel on it must temporarily surrender their private wishes, or, a portion of them, in order to co-operate with others.Click on the large green text to navigate the notes in those chapters. A 2014 advert for Mitsubishi UK shows the evolution of wheels as going from stone (! “The man who takes an automobile and drives it along the open road, is, as it were, a freeholder, also with some of the freeholder’s freedom — though, doubtless, also with some of the freeholder’s limitations and weakness and isolation.

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They bring together neighbors and draw visitors to neighborhood stores. In the 1970s, French historian of technology Jean Gimpel wrote that car-based transportation systems were wasteful and not likely to survive long-term.

These streets ought to be designed for everyone – whether young or old, on foot or on bicycle, in a car or in a bus – but too often they are designed only for speeding cars or creeping traffic jams. He theorised there would be a return to more benign and appropriate forms of transport – such as walking and cycling – just as there would also be a return to cotton and wool despite the supposed superiority of man-made fabrics such as nylon.

We want a vehicle that can run at high speeds in an out of the large towns.

If the motor-car cannot fill this requirement, then something must and will be found that can – underground trams, deep-level tubes, electrified railways … Motor-cars will fall out of the main current of the nation’s life, or rather they will never get into it, and will touch the life of the average man as little does a … “Most of us, both on bicycle and on motor-car, have travelled [the Great North Road].

We have come upon short strips of road, along which we have been able to speed with enjoyment, and we have murmured grateful thanks to the surveyor and the responsible road authority.

Then, with startling abruptness, we have found ourselves upon other stretches the bad condition of which has driven us almost wild with desperation, and we have called upon Heaven to deal out justice in the next world to men whom we cannot bring to book in this.” ” …

transform streets back to what they originally were: public spaces, not spaces for motor cars”: The relatively new American phrase for streets-for-all is “complete streets.” “Streets are an important part of our cities and towns.

They allow children to get to school and parents to get to work. “I’m not an Arcadian, wishing for simpler times”: Rural life may have been simple but it could also be, as Thomas Hobbes wrote in From “The Village” by The Rev. Nevertheless, there are often movements back towards simplicity.

“There was nothing inevitable about the acceptance of motoring”: From “The Motor Problem: A Road Problem,” paper read by William Rees Jeffreys at the Automobile Club, March 12th, 1903: “If you say [25 miles per hour] is for ever impossible in the towns, then you have doomed the motor-car.

If you draw a ring fence round the large centres of population, and, say, that within fifteen miles of the Bank of England, and five miles of the town halls of Manchester, and every other large town, the motor-vehicle must be a crippled thing …

Coventry’s established cycle businesses could amortise the costs of experiments and production of the first models before returns began to flow in.

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