Teen web cam chat like stickam - International friendship and dating russia community sites

(5) A greater depth of understanding of complex content material can be attained by integrating social studies content and skills and by analyzing connections between and among historical periods and events.The list of events and people in this course curriculum should not be considered exhaustive.

international friendship and dating russia community sites-1

(3) To support the teaching of the essential knowledge and skills, the use of a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as state papers, legal documents, charters, constitutions, biographies, autobiographies, speeches, letters, literature, music, art, and architecture is encouraged.

Motivating resources are available from museums, art galleries, and historical sites.

Students analyze the impact of technological innovations on American life.

Students use critical-thinking skills and a variety of primary and secondary source material to explain and apply different methods that historians use to understand and interpret the past, including multiple points of view and historical context.

(7) State and federal laws mandate a variety of celebrations and observances, including Celebrate Freedom Week. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the causes and effects of changing demographic patterns resulting from migration within the United States, including western expansion, rural to urban, the Great Migration, and the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt; and (B) analyze the causes and effects of changing demographic patterns resulting from legal and illegal immigration to the United States. The student understands the relationship between population growth and modernization on the physical environment. The student is expected to: (A) describe how the economic impact of the Transcontinental Railroad and the Homestead Act contributed to the close of the frontier in the late 19th century; (B) describe the changing relationship between the federal government and private business, including the costs and benefits of laissez-faire, anti-trust acts, the Interstate Commerce Act, and the Pure Food and Drug Act; (C) explain how foreign policies affected economic issues such as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the Open Door Policy, Dollar Diplomacy, and immigration quotas; (D) describe the economic effects of international military conflicts, including the Spanish-American War and World War I, on the United States; and (E) describe the emergence of monetary policy in the United States, including the Federal Reserve Act of 1913 and the shifting trend from a gold standard to fiat money. The student understands significant economic developments between World War I and World War II. The student is expected to: (A) describe the economic effects of World War II on the home front such as the end of the Great Depression, rationing, and increased opportunity for women and minority employment; (B) identify the causes of prosperity in the 1950s, including the Baby Boom and the impact of the GI Bill (Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944), and the effects of prosperity in the 1950s such as increased consumption and the growth of agriculture and business; (C) describe the economic impact of defense spending on the business cycle and education priorities from 1945 to the 1990s; (D) identify actions of government and the private sector such as the Great Society, affirmative action, and Title IX to create economic opportunities for citizens and analyze the unintended consequences of each; and (E) describe the dynamic relationship between U. The student is expected to: (A) evaluate the impact of New Deal legislation on the historical roles of state and federal government; (B) explain constitutional issues raised by federal government policy changes during times of significant events, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the 1960s, and 9/11; (C) describe the effects of political scandals, including Teapot Dome, Watergate, and Bill Clinton's impeachment, on the views of U. citizens concerning trust in the federal government and its leaders; (D) discuss the role of contemporary government legislation in the private and public sectors such as the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977, USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009; and (E) evaluate the pros and cons of U. participation in international organizations and treaties. The student is expected to: (A) describe the impact of events such as the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and the War Powers Act on the relationship between the legislative and executive branches of government; and (B) evaluate the impact of relationships among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, including Franklin D. The student is expected to: (A) analyze the effects of landmark U. The student is expected to: (A) use a variety of both primary and secondary valid sources to acquire information and to analyze and answer historical questions; (B) analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions; (C) understand how historians interpret the past (historiography) and how their interpretations of history may change over time; (D) use the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple types of sources of evidence; (E) evaluate the validity of a source based on language, corroboration with other sources, and information about the author, including points of view, frames of reference, and historical context; (F) identify bias in written, oral, and visual material; (G) identify and support with historical evidence a point of view on a social studies issue or event; and (H) use appropriate skills to analyze and interpret social studies information such as maps, graphs, presentations, speeches, lectures, and political cartoons. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms.

ach social studies class shall include, during Celebrate Freedom Week as provided under the TEC, 29.907, or during another full school week as determined by the board of trustees of a school district, appropriate instruction concerning the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, in their historical contexts. The student is expected to: (A) identify the effects of population growth and distribution on the physical environment; (B) identify the roles of governmental entities and private citizens in managing the environment such as the establishment of the National Park System, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Endangered Species Act; and (C) understand the effects of governmental actions on individuals, industries, and communities, including the impact on Fifth Amendment property rights. The student understands domestic and foreign issues related to U. The student is expected to: (A) analyze causes of economic growth and prosperity in the 1920s, including Warren Harding's Return to Normalcy, reduced taxes, and increased production efficiencies; (B) identify the causes of the Great Depression, including the impact of tariffs on world trade, stock market speculation, bank failures, and the monetary policy of the Federal Reserve System; (C) analyze the effects of the Great Depression on the U. economy and society such as widespread unemployment and deportation and repatriation of people of European and Mexican heritage and others; (D) compare the New Deal policies and its opponents' approaches to resolving the economic effects of the Great Depression; and (E) describe how various New Deal agencies and programs, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Social Security Administration, continue to affect the lives of U. The student is expected to: (A) create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information; (B) use correct social studies terminology to explain historical concepts; and (C) use different forms of media to convey information, including written to visual and statistical to written or visual, using available computer software as appropriate. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data.Pershing; (E) analyze the impact of significant technological innovations in World War I such as machine guns, airplanes, tanks, poison gas, and trench warfare that resulted in the stalemate on the Western Front; (F) analyze major issues such as isolationism and neutrality raised by U. involvement in World War I, Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, and the Treaty of Versailles; and (G) analyze significant events such as the Battle of Argonne Forest. The student understands the effects of reform and third-party movements in the early 20th century. The student is expected to: (A) trace the historical development of the civil rights movement in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, including the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th amendments; (B) describe the roles of political organizations that promoted civil rights, including ones from African American, Chicano, American Indian, women's, and other civil rights movements; (C) identify the roles of significant leaders who supported various rights movements, including Martin Luther King Jr., Cesar Chavez, Rosa Parks, Hector P. The major emphasis is on the study of significant people, events, and issues from the earliest times to the present.The student is expected to: (A) evaluate the impact of Progressive Era reforms, including initiative, referendum, recall, and the passage of the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th amendments; (B) evaluate the impact of muckrakers and reform leaders such as Upton Sinclair, Susan B. Garcia, and Betty Friedan; (D) compare and contrast the approach taken by some civil rights groups such as the Black Panthers with the nonviolent approach of Martin Luther King Jr.; (E) discuss the impact of the writings of Martin Luther King Jr. Traditional historical points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as in civilizations in other parts of the world.The student is expected to: (A) explain why significant events, policies, and individuals such as the Spanish-American War, U. expansionism, Henry Cabot Lodge, Alfred Thayer Mahan, Theodore Roosevelt, Sanford B. Du Bois on American society; and (C) evaluate the impact of third parties, including the Populist and Progressive parties. The student understands significant events, social issues, and individuals of the 1920s. The student understands the domestic and international impact of U. Roosevelt and Harry Truman during World War II, including the U. relationship with its allies and domestic industry's rapid mobilization for the war effort; (C) analyze the function of the U. Office of War Information; (D) analyze major issues of World War II, including the Holocaust; the internment of German, Italian, and Japanese Americans and Executive Order 9066; and the development of conventional and atomic weapons; (E) analyze major military events of World War II, including the Battle of Midway, the U. military advancement through the Pacific Islands, the Bataan Death March, the invasion of Normandy, fighting the war on multiple fronts, and the liberation of concentration camps; (F) evaluate the military contributions of leaders during World War II, including Omar Bradley, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas Mac Arthur, Chester A. responses to Soviet aggression after World War II, including the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the Berlin airlift, and John F. Source: The provisions of this 113.41 adopted to be effective August 23, 2010, 35 Tex Reg 7232. World History Studies (One Credit), Beginning with School Year 2011-2012. Students shall be awarded one unit of credit for successful completion of this course. (1)World History Studies is a survey of the history of humankind.Dole, and missionaries moved the United States into the position of a world power; (B) evaluate American expansionism, including acquisitions such as Guam, Hawaii, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico; (C) identify the causes of World War I and reasons for U. entry; (D) understand the contributions of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) led by General John J. The student is expected to: (A) analyze causes and effects of events and social issues such as immigration, Social Darwinism, eugenics, race relations, nativism, the Red Scare, Prohibition, and the changing role of women; and (B) analyze the impact of significant individuals such as Clarence Darrow, William Jennings Bryan, Henry Ford, Glenn Curtiss, Marcus Garvey, and Charles A. Nimitz, George Marshall, and George Patton; and (G) explain the home front and how American patriotism inspired exceptional actions by citizens and military personnel, including high levels of military enlistment; volunteerism; the purchase of war bonds; Victory Gardens; the bravery and contributions of the Tuskegee Airmen, the Flying Tigers, and the Navajo Code Talkers; and opportunities and obstacles for women and ethnic minorities. The student understands the impact of significant national and international decisions and conflicts in the Cold War on the United States. Kennedy's role in the Cuban Missile Crisis; (B) describe how Cold War tensions were intensified by the arms race, the space race, Mc Carthyism, and the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), the findings of which were confirmed by the Venona Papers; (C) explain reasons and outcomes for U. involvement in the Korean War and its relationship to the containment policy; (D) explain reasons and outcomes for U. involvement in foreign countries and their relationship to the Domino Theory, including the Vietnam War; (E) analyze the major issues and events of the Vietnam War such as the Tet Offensive, the escalation of forces, Vietnamization, and the fall of Saigon; and (F) describe the responses to the Vietnam War such as the draft, the 26th Amendment, the role of the media, the credibility gap, the silent majority, and the anti-war movement. The student understands the impact of the American civil rights movement. Due to the expanse of world history and the time limitations of the school year, the scope of this course should focus on "essential" concepts and skills that can be applied to various eras, events, and people within the standards in subsection (c) of this section. Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Social Studies, High School, Beginning with School Year 2011-2012.

Tags: , ,