Adult phone chat lines in

Bentz founded a company called Advanced Telecom Services to assist 900 number entrepreneurs, and soon he’d helped launch phone lines that look like a preview of today’s most popular websites.

Adult phone chat lines in-83

The episode caused such an unexpected spike in calls that AT&T, the phone carrier, later created AT&T billed more than $200,000 that night, marking a glorious moment for the young 900 number business.

In the late 1980s, dialing a number with the 900 prefix on your landline phone became a way to gain access to a web of information on any number of subjects before the Internet as we know it existed.

“You want to save Larry the Lobster,” Murphy told the viewers, “dial 1-900-720-1808. Now, unless you call in to save him, we’re going to boil Larry’s little butt right here on national television…The phone company is going to charge you 50 cents, but isn’t it worth 50 cents to save Larry’s life?

Or look at it this way: Isn’t it worth half a buck to see us boil Larry on TV?

But instead of offering it for free alongside poorly-performing ads, 900 numbers supported content creators.

A typical call cost

A typical call cost $1.99 for the first minute, and 99 cents for each additional minute.There was no Internet to speak of, so if you were a Florida Gators alum living in Salt Lake City, and you wanted to hear interviews with coaches and the latest recruiting news, you could call the Eventually ATS was running hotlines for 65 Division I college football teams, 20 NFL teams, and a handful of MLB and NBA teams.The numbers were run by local sports reporters who supplemented their income by contributing to the lines. People looking for a date would call a 900 number, listen to a voice recording of someone whose description they read in the newspaper, and then leave them a message.(Other prefixes, notably 976, had already attracted millions of calls to regional services.) In 1982, more than a million people called what eventually came to be known as In 1987, AT&T started a national program that allowed 900 number information providers—people who provided the audio content—the chance to earn money from their numbers.Similar to the way anyone can now start their own e-commerce website, AT&T opened up the 900 program to any entrepreneur who had an idea, and set a price of up to $2.00 for the first minute of a call (and more for additional minutes).Larry the Lobster was just a blip on what would soon become a billion-dollar industry.

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A typical call cost $1.99 for the first minute, and 99 cents for each additional minute.

There was no Internet to speak of, so if you were a Florida Gators alum living in Salt Lake City, and you wanted to hear interviews with coaches and the latest recruiting news, you could call the Eventually ATS was running hotlines for 65 Division I college football teams, 20 NFL teams, and a handful of MLB and NBA teams.

The numbers were run by local sports reporters who supplemented their income by contributing to the lines. People looking for a date would call a 900 number, listen to a voice recording of someone whose description they read in the newspaper, and then leave them a message.

(Other prefixes, notably 976, had already attracted millions of calls to regional services.) In 1982, more than a million people called what eventually came to be known as In 1987, AT&T started a national program that allowed 900 number information providers—people who provided the audio content—the chance to earn money from their numbers.

Similar to the way anyone can now start their own e-commerce website, AT&T opened up the 900 program to any entrepreneur who had an idea, and set a price of up to $2.00 for the first minute of a call (and more for additional minutes).

Larry the Lobster was just a blip on what would soon become a billion-dollar industry.

||

A typical call cost $1.99 for the first minute, and 99 cents for each additional minute.

There was no Internet to speak of, so if you were a Florida Gators alum living in Salt Lake City, and you wanted to hear interviews with coaches and the latest recruiting news, you could call the Eventually ATS was running hotlines for 65 Division I college football teams, 20 NFL teams, and a handful of MLB and NBA teams.

The numbers were run by local sports reporters who supplemented their income by contributing to the lines. People looking for a date would call a 900 number, listen to a voice recording of someone whose description they read in the newspaper, and then leave them a message.

(Other prefixes, notably 976, had already attracted millions of calls to regional services.) In 1982, more than a million people called what eventually came to be known as In 1987, AT&T started a national program that allowed 900 number information providers—people who provided the audio content—the chance to earn money from their numbers.

.99 for the first minute, and 99 cents for each additional minute.

There was no Internet to speak of, so if you were a Florida Gators alum living in Salt Lake City, and you wanted to hear interviews with coaches and the latest recruiting news, you could call the Eventually ATS was running hotlines for 65 Division I college football teams, 20 NFL teams, and a handful of MLB and NBA teams.

The numbers were run by local sports reporters who supplemented their income by contributing to the lines. People looking for a date would call a 900 number, listen to a voice recording of someone whose description they read in the newspaper, and then leave them a message.

(Other prefixes, notably 976, had already attracted millions of calls to regional services.) In 1982, more than a million people called what eventually came to be known as In 1987, AT&T started a national program that allowed 900 number information providers—people who provided the audio content—the chance to earn money from their numbers.

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